Alumni College Football Players

Alumni College Players for the Missouri Wolverines Youth Tackle and Flag Football Club in Kansas City Missouri

The Missouri Wolverines Youth Football Club's measure of success has not been by the number of trophies we win but the success of the players we have developed over the past 21 years. And to be clear, we our blessed to have a facility with close to a hundred trophies to show our enormous success over the past 21 years but our most important victory has been laying a postive foundation in our youth athletes so they will have the Commitment + Loyalty + Desire to be the very best which we hope will allow them to not only compete and be successful on the high school level but will allow them the foundation to continue their dream onto the college level.

 

Since 1999, the Missouri Wolverines have had the honor to have over 75 former youth football players go on to play on the collegiate level at 45 different colleges or universities across the United States from all levels with 21 former players going to play at the Division I level and 32 players going on to play at the Division II level.  It all starts with the proper foundation and we are so very proud of all of our Missouri Wolverine players who trusted in our program to help them achieve their dreams.

 

If you are new to the Missouri Wolverines Football Club and looking for a reason to choose our program over the numerous other youth football programs in the Kansas City Metro Area, please take a hard close look at these figures... these are not promises but are facts and more importantly results of what our program has done for so many youth athletes in the Kansas City Missouri Metro Area.

 

45 Colleges/Universities (75 Players)


DIVISIONS NUMBER OF SCHOOLS # OF PLAYERS
D1 FBS 10 13
D1 FCS 6 8
Division II 12 31
NAIA 10 15
Division III 4 4
Junior College 3 5

 

Breakdown of the NCAA and NAIA Divisions for college football for alumni players from the Missouri Wolverines Youth Football Program in Kansas City Missouri

Division I - FBS FOOTBALL BOWL SUBDIVISION

 

FBS is the top level of collegiate football competition. It is comprised of 129 programs from large, mostly public, universities (with some exceptions such as Notre Dame, Northwestern, and Stanford), and includes all major teams and conferences. FBS games are televised nationally with 12 regular season games and a potential of a bowl game for teams that win 6 or more games. The FBS National Champion is decided through a 4 team playoff bracket with the two winning teams playing for the Championship. Athletes who play in the FBS will usually play in large stadiums of between 20,000 and 115,000 person capacity.

FBS schools recruit nationally and are very selective, with only 1 in every 100 high schoolers recruited to play there. Players wanting to play at the D1 level must meet the GPA requirements for recruitment (see article). Each program is capped at 85 scholarships per team and each team can recruit up to 25 scholarship players per year - however, each recruiting class typically has between 15 and 20 scholarship players. The NCAA requires that each scholarship must be awarded to a single individual and cannot be divided among several players. The teams have a roster of between 100-120 players and a staff of 30-50 people dedicated to football, with football-only strength staff, medical staff, recruiting staff, academic staff, and operational staff.

Division I - FCS FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP SUBDIVISION

FCS is the second highest level of collegiate football. This division is comprised of 124 mostly medium-sized public institutions. Games are sometimes on cable channels but are often available with a high-quality online broadcast. The teams play 11 regular season games followed by a 24 team playoff bracket. Athletes in the FCS will usually play in stadiums of between 5,000 and 25,000 person capacity.

Like the FBS, FCS programs are highly selective and only about 1 in every 40 high school football athletes will play in the FCS. Like FBS schools, FCS schools also have to follow the academic requirements set by D1 (see article). Most of the programs focus their recruitment regionally, but some schools such as those in the Ivy League will recruit nationally. The programs are capped at 63 scholarships and each team can give up to 30 scholarships to incoming players per year (Ivy and Pioneer leagues do not offer athletic scholarships). Unlike the FBS, FCS scholarships can be divided into partial awards, but most players get a full ride. The teams have approximately 11 full-time coaches and a roster of about 80 to 110 players. The teams typically share facilities and other resources such as the medical and academic staff with the rest of the athletic department.

Division II

D2 football is comprised of smaller football programs (mostly regional public schools) that still offer some scholarships. The division hosts 169 football teams that play 11 regular season games and a 28 team playoff bracket. Most of the teams have a stadium capacity of between 5,000 and 15,000 seats and their games are mainly covered online.

Division 2 football teams are selective in the players their recruit, with only 1 in every 20 high school athletes making it to D2. Each athlete must also meet the GPA requirements set by the division (which are lower than D1, see article). Teams mostly recruit regionally and offer up to 36 full scholarship equivalents. While there is a cap at 36 full scholarships, each of those can be split up any way the school would like. For example, a school can give 36 full scholarships or 72 half scholarships. They can also give 30 full scholarships and 10 half scholarships and 4 quarter scholarships, etc. Additionally, many schools and conferences offer less than the full 36 scholarships. The teams have a typical roster size of between 100 to 140 players and a smaller staff when compared to D1 (comprised of a mix of full-time and part-time coaches). D2 football teams share facilities and support staffs with the rest of the athletic department.

NAIA

National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) football consists of schools that are not associated with the NCAA. These schools are typically similar to NCAA D2. While there are NAIA schools in 24 different states, 69 of the 92 total NAIA schools are located in 11 states: Kansas (13), Iowa (9), Kentucky (7), Illinois (6), Missouri (6), Florida (6), Montana (5), Nebraska (5), North Dakota (4), Indiana (4), and Texas (4). NAIA has its own academic requirements that must be met before an athlete can receive an offer.

Division III

D3 football consists of the smallest NCAA football programs and does not offer athletic scholarships. The programs in D3 are mostly small private schools with a few small public schools competing as well. The division hosts 249 football teams that play 10 regular season games with a 32 team playoff bracket format. Most of the teams have a stadium capacity between 2,000 and 5,000 seats and the games are covered online.

Division 3 teams are still pretty selective, with only 1 in 13 high school players making it onto a team. While not mandated by the NCAA, Division 3 schools have some of the toughest GPA requirements because of the academic caliber of schools in the division (see article). These schools focus largely on regional recruits. While D3 schools do not offer athletic scholarships, they combine need-based financial aid with academic scholarships in order to reduce the cost for their athletes. In many cases, the combined financial package from a D3 school can be a better deal than a small athletic scholarship from a D2 team. The teams can have a large roster size of over 150 players, with a large percentage comprising of freshmen athletes because many D3 players quit during or after their freshman season. Like D2 schools, D3 programs tend to have a smaller staff with a mix of full-time and part-time coaches. The facilities and support staff are shared across the athletic department and sometimes with the general student body.

Junior College

Division 3 teams are still pretty selective, with only 1 in 13 high school players making it onto a team. While not mandated by the NCAA, Division 3 schools have some of the toughest GPA requirements because of the academic caliber of schools in the division (see article). These schools focus largely on regional recruits. While D3 schools do not offer athletic scholarships, they combine need-based financial aid with academic scholarships in order to reduce the cost for their athletes. In many cases, the combined financial package from a D3 school can be a better deal than a small athletic scholarship from a D2 team. The teams can have a large roster size of over 150 players, with a large percentage comprising of freshmen athletes because many D3 players quit during or after their freshman season. Like D2 schools, D3 programs tend to have a smaller staff with a mix of full-time and part-time coaches. The facilities and support staff are shared across the athletic department and sometimes with the general student body.

If you are a good athlete but your grades are not good enough, PG and JC schools are a good option to qualify and get recruited. PG programs will only make a small change to your GPA, so PG schools are best if you are very close to meeting the minimum requirements or if you can significantly improve your ACT/SAT test scores. JC’s are different, after 2 years and earning an AA degree, your high school grades and test scores will not matter for most schools. This can be a good option for athletes that are not close to the grades they need to qualify.

It is realistic for the average athlete’s recruiting interest to increase by one division from what they are getting out of high school, but it is not a guarantee. In most cases, it is best not to pass up existing scholarship offers in order to attend a PG or JC program with a hope that your options will improve, because they may stay the same or get worse. Additionally, both JC and PG options can be especially good for players that get injured before or during their senior year.




45 Colleges/Universities (76 Players)


DIVISIONS NUMBER OF SCHOOLS # OF PLAYERS
D1 FBS 10 13
D1 FCS 6 8
Division II 12 31
NAIA 10 16
Division III 4 4
Junior College 3 5
SCHOOL NAME LOCATION # OF PLAYERS DIVISION
University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri 3 Division I FBS - NCAA
University of Iowa Iowa City, Iowa 2 Division I FBS - NCAA
Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 1 Division I FBS - NCAA
Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas 1 Division I FBS - NCAA
New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico 1 Division I FBS - NCAA
United States Air Force Academy Air Force Academy, Colorado 1 Division I FBS - NCAA
University of Kansas Lawrence, Kansas 1 Division I FBS - NCAA
University of Nebraska Lincoln, Nebraska 1 Division I FBS - NCAA
University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) Oxford, Mississippi 1 Division I FBS - NCAA
University of Wyoming Laramie, Wyoming 1 Division I FBS - NCAA
Howard University Washington, DC 1 Division I FCS - NCAA
Missouri State University Springfield, Missouri 3 Division I FCS - NCAA
Northern Illinois DeKalb, Illinois 1 Division I FCS - NCAA
Southeast Missouri State University Cape Girardeau, Missouri 1 Division I FCS - NCAA
Southern Illinois DeKalb, Illinois 1 Division I FCS - NCAA
University of North Dakota Grand Folks, North Dakota 1 Division I FCS - NCAA
William Jewell College Liberty, Missouri 9 Division II - NCAA
Missouri Western State University St. Joseph, Missouri 5 Division II - NCAA
Central Missouri State University Warrensburg, Missouri 3 Division II - NCAA
Lincoln University Jefferson City, Missouri 3 Division II - NCAA
Washburn University Topeka, Kansas 3 Division II - NCAA
Northwest Missouri State Maryville, Missouri 2 Division II - NCAA
Truman State University Kirksville, Missouri 2 Division II - NCAA
Lindenwood University St. Louis, Missouri 1 Division II - NCAA
Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri-Rolla) Rolla, Missouri 1 Division II - NCAA
Pittsburg State University Pittsburg, Kansas 1 Division II - NCAA
University of Nebraska Kearney Kearney, Nebraska 1 Division II - NCAA
Quincy University Quincy, Illinois 1 Division II - NCAA
Benedictine College Atchinson, Kansas 3 NAIA
MidAmerican Nazarene University Olathe, Kansas 3 NAIA
Avila University Kansas City, Missouri 2 NAIA
William Penn University Oskaloosa, Iowa 2 NAIA
Butler Community College El Dorado, Kansas 1 NAIA
Friends University Overland Park, Kansas 1 NAIA
Indiana Wesleyan University Marion, Indiana 1 NAIA
Culver-Stockton University Canton, Missouri 1 NAIA
Peru State University Peru, Nebraska 1 NAIA
University of Saint Mary Leavenworth, Kansas 1 NAIA
Carthage College Kenosha, Wisconsin 1 Division III - NCAA
Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio 1 Division III - NCAA
Central College Pella, Iowa 1 Division III - NCAA
Wilkes University Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylania 1 Division III - NCAA
College of the Canyons Santa Clarita, California 2 Community College
Iowa Western Community College Council Bluffs, Iowa 2 Community College
Dakota College at Bottineau Bottineau, North Dakota 1 Community College

2021 Youth Football Signups


2021 Youth Football Signups
The Missouri Wolverines Youth Football Club in Kansas City Missouri is accepting signups for players for any player looking to play youth tackle tackle or flag football in Kansas City Missouri. Current and New Players are encouraged to sign up online via our online registration portal where they can also pay for football fees as well.

Online Registration is Open for players to Register Now for the 2021 Missouri Wolverines Youth Football Club in Kansas City Missour


Kansas City Athlete Training


Off-Season Football Training
At Kansas City Athlete Training located in Kansas City Missouri, experienced as well as beginner football players can work on improving during the offseason by attending one or several Football Specific Training Classes to improve their techniques as well as get in shape by attending Speed and Agility Sports Performance Training including Middle School Weightlifting. The Missouri Wolverines Youth Football Club highly recommends all current, new and/or interested football players looking to join the Missouri Wolverines to attend classes leading up to the fall season. Kansas City Athlete Training has provided training for all sports via speed and agility classes and weightlifting classes plus football training for every position on the field including 1-on-1 personal training since 2005.


Kansas City Youth Football Camp


2022 Kansas City Youth Football Camp
*RECOMMENDED FOR ALL MISSOURI WOLVERINES PLAYERS
WHEN: Monday June 13th - Thursday June 16th
TIME: 6:30pm - 8:30pm
WHERE: Kansas City Athlete Training Facility
REGISTRATION: www.kcfootballcamp.com
The Kansas City Youth Football Camp Staff is proud to announce the 21st Year of our annual Youth Football Camp. The 21st Annual Kansas City Youth Football Camp focusing on the techniques and fundamentals needed to succeed at the youth level and to help players prepare for the 2022 football season. Aside from learning the game of football, camp staff will talk to the players each night about football, life, and why playing youth football is important.